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Kerner

The Kerner grape was first bred in 1929 in Germany by August Herold, a grape breeder in the Württemberg wine region. The grape is named after a local poet and Harold's friend, Justinius Kerner. It is a cross between the Riesling and Trollinger grapes. It wasn't until the 1970's that the grape became popular with the wineries. Today, it is planted in every wine region in Germany, covering 9,894 acres (4,004 hectares) or 3.9% of Germany's wine regions.

Kerner wines are produced in every ripeness level and taste. They are light to golden yellow in color. They are similar to Riesling - fresh acidity, rich, fruity character - yet are more fragrant than the Riesling, showing hints of pears, citrus, apples, red currants, and apricots.

Dry and medium dry Kerner wines go well with light appetizers, salads, pasta, seafood, poultry, veal, asparagus, and mild cheese. Fruity Kerner wines fit particularly well to apple-based desserts.





 




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